Dean’s staircase/Geometric staircase in St. Paul’s Cathedral, London. Created by Christopher Wren the staircase uses no pins to hold it in place and is held together by tension between the top and bottom step and the millimeter of overlap between stairs. [3024×4032]

Dean’s staircase/Geometric staircase in St. Paul’s Cathedral, London. Created by Christopher Wren the staircase uses no pins to hold it in place and is held together by tension between the top and bottom step and the millimeter of overlap between stairs. [3024×4032]

The Armento Rider, Greece 500 – 550 BCE. Bronze statuette of a warrior on horseback. The warrior wears a Corinthian-style helmet and a short tunic. He once held a spear and reins, that were probably made of copper wire, and his helmet was topped by a crest which ran across sideways.[750×906]

The Armento Rider, Greece 500 – 550 BCE. Bronze statuette of a warrior on horseback. The warrior wears a Corinthian-style helmet and a short tunic. He once held a spear and reins, that were probably made of copper wire, and his helmet was topped by a crest which ran across sideways.[750×906]

Exercise Desert Rock IV, June 1, 1952. Sixth Army troops from Camp Desert Rock attack towards an atomic blast during a maneuver held by the Army at the AEC’s Nevada Proving Grounds in conjunction with the Atomic Energy Commission’s Tumbler-Snapper George nuclear test. [800 × 602]

Exercise Desert Rock IV, June 1, 1952. Sixth Army troops from Camp Desert Rock attack towards an atomic blast during a maneuver held by the Army at the AEC’s Nevada Proving Grounds in conjunction with the Atomic Energy Commission’s Tumbler-Snapper George nuclear test. [800 × 602]

Letter written in Latin to Pope Paul V from Daimyo Date Masamune. Delivered as part of the Keicho Embassy (1613-1620). Though well-received, it had little long-term political effect. The letter, along with a corresponding version in Japanese, is held in the Vatican Archives. [440×1157]

Letter written in Latin to Pope Paul V from Daimyo Date Masamune. Delivered as part of the Keicho Embassy (1613-1620). Though well-received, it had little long-term political effect. The letter, along with a corresponding version in Japanese, is held in the Vatican Archives. [440×1157]